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Gene pool engineering for entrepreneurs: Conclusion (11/11)

In essence, management for environments with rapid change or where new rules are being added to the competitive landscape are very different from management for relatively stable environments where the rules of engagement stay relatively consistent over time and old institutional learning, applied with discipline and process is the right approach. And each type of environment requires its own unique approach beyond building the precisely engineered teams. When venture capitalists perform portfolio assessments, a strong correlation emerges between the strength of the team and confidence in the likelihood of a positive outcome. But beyond strength of the team attention is seldom paid to the engineering of the team to the specific risks and opportunities that a stratup has.

management for environments with rapid change or where new rules are being added to the competitive landscape are very different from management for relatively stable environments where the rules of engagement stay relatively consistent over time and old institutional learning, applied with discipline and process is the right approach.

The goal here is to make the platitude of “hire great people” a more actionable and quantifiable process. Great ideas suffering from poor execution can kill companies, while less spectacular ideas coupled with phenomenal teams can quickly swing a company from troubled to a success. But beyond this correlation, our experience says engineering the gene pool to the task at hand may be just as important if not more so than pure excellence. Consequently, managers should focus on building an organization by collecting a diversity of talent vs. simply hiring to a functional plan or budget. While there are multiple mainstream approaches to building great teams through functional recruiting, the gene pool engineering construct can create the entrepreneurial, problem-solving and rapidly evolving culture, goals and plans that have become the hallmark of many Silicon Valley success stories. Leaders and managers should act as shepherds rather than sergeants, and focus on applying this approach to mitigate risk and accelerate new opportunities for a rapidly growing business.

make the platitude of “hire great people” a more actionable and quantifiable process. Great ideas suffering from poor execution can kill companies, while less spectacular ideas coupled with phenomenal teams can quickly swing a company from troubled to a success.

 

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